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Category: Anthropology

A Video From the Vault: Riverside Newman Center 2012

A Video From the Vault: Riverside Newman Center 2012

I made this video for “Ethnographic Field Methods,” a course in the department of Anthropology at UC Riverside in 2012. I spent three months at the Newman Center conducting ethnographic research. In this video you hear clips of an interview I conducted with Pepsai regarding the Holy Spirit and the Host.

Empires of the Sun – Culture and Power in Mesoamerica, in Homage to Dr. Patricia Anawalt on April 4-5, 2014

Empires of the Sun – Culture and Power in Mesoamerica, in Homage to Dr. Patricia Anawalt on April 4-5, 2014

The Art History Society of California State University Los Angeles invites you to our 2014 Symposium. Our honoree for the 2014 Mesoamerican Symposium is Dr. Patricia Reiff Anawalt. Dr. Anawalt is world renowned for her expertise in the regalia of ritual, power and quotidian life of Mesoamerican civilizations as well as for her interpretative reading of the Codex Mendoza.

 

The Codex Mendoza is the historic record of the Mexica from 1325 through 1521 that includes the detailed founding of Tenochtitlan. Among Dr. Anawalt’s published books is The Essential Codex Mendoza (co-authored with Dr. Frances Berdan), Clothing Before Cortes: Mesoamerican Costumes from the Codices (The Civilization of the American Indian Series), Shamanic Regalia from the Far North, and various others.

 

Dr. Anawalt is also the founding director of the Center for the Study of Regional Dress, a laboratory and research center located at the Fowler Museum. Our symposiums are the largest Mesoamerican gatherings in the United States and Europe by featuring top scholars and academics in the field of Mesoamerican Studies. Please glance at the attached documents which indicate the topics and lecturers that will be presented. Do not miss this stellar event. Register via Email: AHSCSULA@gmail.com. Help us pass the word by sharing this event on Facebook.

 

We look forward to hosting you on April 4-5, 2014.

 

Art History Society of California State University, Los Angeles

Jaguars, Eagles and Feathered Serpents: Mesoamerica Re-explored An Homage to Michael Coe

Jaguars, Eagles and Feathered Serpents: Mesoamerica Re-explored An Homage to Michael Coe

This conference will be held at California State University Los Angeles.

 

I will update with more details as they become available.

 

 

Friday, April 12, 2013

8:00 am           Registration

9:30 am           Opening Remarks

9:45 am           Leonardo López Luján (INAH)
Urban Archaeology in Downtown Mexico City and the Proyecto Templo Mayor

10:15 am         Saburo Sugiyama (Arizona State / INAH) / Tenoch Medina (INAH)
Time and space Materialized in the Templo Mayor Architecture: A New 3D Map of the Sacred Precinct of Tenochtitlan

15 minute break

11:00 am         María Barajas Rocha (INAH)
Conservation of the Tlaltecuhtli Monolith and Archaeological Objects Recovered During the 7th Field Season of Proyecto Templo Mayor

11:30 am         Ximena Chávez Balderas (INAH)
Effigies of the Dead: Ritual Decapitation and Skull Modification at the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan

12:00 pm         Amaranta Arguelles (INAH)
A Cosmogonic Ritual at the Foot of the Tenochtitlan’s Templo Mayor

12:30 pm lunch

1:45 pm          Leonardo López Luján (INAH)
Tenochtitlan’s Gold: The Archaeological Collection of Proyecto Templo Mayor

2:30 pm          John M.D. Pohl (UCLA)
The Toltec Ballgame: Rewards, Titles and Position in Postclassic Society

15 minute break

3:30 pm              Guilhem Olivier (UNAM)
Myth and Ritual of Access to Power in the Central Part of the Codex Borgia: A Proposal

4:15 pm          Manuel Aguilar-Moreno (CSULA)
The Millenialist Utopia of the Indian Jerusalem: Indian-Christian Art and Transculturation in 16th Century Mexico

5:30 pm          Q & A

6 pm               Reception with Mexican Snacks and Mariachi

 

 

Saturday, April 13, 2013

8:30 am          Registration

9:30 am          Opening Remarks

9:45 am          Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers (CalPoly Pomona)
Tlaloc on the Coast: Teotihuacan and Los Horcones, Chiapas

10:30 am         Megan O’Neil (BMCC-CUNY)
Topic TBA

15 minute break

11:30 am            Oswaldo Chinchilla (Yale)
Atle itlacauhca, without Flaw: The Young Gods of the Maya and Aztec

12:15 am         Mary Miller (Yale)
The Bonampak Murals: A Performance at the Maya Court

1 pm lunch

2:15 pm         Stephen D. Houston (Brown)
Run, Don’t Walk: Sacred Movement among the Classic Maya

3:00 pm         Robert H. Cobean (INAH)
Research at Ancient Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico: The Recent INAH Projects

15 minute break

4:00 pm              Karl Taube (UCR)
The Living Faces of Maize of Ancient Mesoamerica

4:45 pm          Award Ceremony

5:15 pm          Michael Coe (Yale)
Chocolate and the Mesoamerican Mind

6:00 pm          Q & A

6:30 pm          Autograph & Photograph Opportunities

 

REGISTER AHSMeso2013@gmail.com

ADMISSION: $15 Public / $10 All University Students / CSULA students receive an ASI discount

For more details follow us on Facebook:  AHS (Art History Society at CSULA)

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries Across the Americas – 2/1/2013 at the University of Arizona

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries Across the Americas – 2/1/2013 at the University of Arizona

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries

   Across the Americas

University of Arizona, Center for Latin American Studies Human Rights Initiative

                                   and                                                    

Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, Rogers College of Law

Friday, February 1, 2013

8:30am – 6pm

Arizona Historical Society

949 E. 2nd Street

The objective of this one day conference is to bring to the fore a range of issues and concerns with regard to natural resource extraction on indigenous lands across the Americas. Drawing on a human rights framework the conference participants examine some of the multiple, complex responses by indigenous peoples to the social, juridical and environmental dimensions of extraction. Recent examples from Chile to Mesoamerica to the United States, Canada and the Russian Far North illustrate the timeliness of such an examination.

 

The conference intends to facilitate a meaningful exchange of ideas and practices among social science and legal scholars, activists and between the university and the community at large. We broaden our scope geographically to open a discussion about the commonalities and contradictions that ordinary indigenous people face on their homelands. The Center for Latin American Studies will interview and film with each participant at the conference about their work. These five minute video clips will be made available on their UA LAS website.

 

Provisional Program

 

8:00 coffee

 

8:30 Yaqui Pascua opening ceremony( not confirmed)

 

8:45 Dean JP Jones, College of Social and Behavioral Science – Welcome

9:00 Professor Linda Green, Director, Center for Latin American Studies, Associate Professor of Anthropology – opening remarks, moderator

 

KeyNote

9:15  Dr. Salvador Aquino, anthropologist, CIESAS, Pacifico Sur,  Cuidad de  Oaxaca, Mexico  “Si a la vida, no a la mineria: Large scale mining exploitation and the challenges confronting indigenous peoples in Mexico”

 

10:15 coffee break

 

Panel

10:30 Professor Benadict Colombi, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, American Indian Studies, UA, “Kamchatka: Mapping Indigenous Cartographies and Extractive Industries”

11:00 Professor Dana Powell, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Appalachian State University  “Extractive Industries have productive effects: Energy activism on the Dine Nation”

11:30 Mr. Manuel Prieto, PhD student, School of Geography and Development, UA “The Chilean Water Reforms: Mining and Dispossession of the Atacameno People”

12:00 Mr. Cory Schott, PhD candidate, Dept. of History, UA “Colonial Histories of Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries in the Americas

12:15 Mr. Sebastian Quinac, “Reporting from the “Encouentro del Pueblos de MesoAmerica “, Sierra de Oaxaca, January 2013

 

12:30 Discussion

 

12:45-1:30 lunch hosted by LAS and IPLPP

 

1:30 Professor Robert A.Williams, Jr., E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law and American Indian Studies,  Faculty Co-Chair, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program,UA- “Indigenous Peoples’ Human Rights to Ancestral Lands in Historical and Contemporary Perspective:Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group v. Canada”

2:30 Professor James Hopkins, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, UA, “Rio Yaqui Land and Water Rights and the Agro-Chem Industrial Complex”

3:00  Ms. Seanna Howard, Staff Attorney, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program—“Maya Community of Southern Belize and Western Shoshone: Indigenous Peoples and the Inter-American Human Rights System”

3:30 “Arizona Tribes, Extractive Industries and Indigenous Human Rights”- (speaker TBA)

4:00

Mr. Austin Nunez, Chairman, San Xavier District, Tohono O’odham Nation—Mining, Water and O’odham lands (not confirmed)

Mr. Vernon Masayesva, Founder and Director of The Black Mesa Trust and former Tribal Chairman of The Hopi Nation—coal mining, water and Hopi lands (not confirmed)

 

4:30 Discussion

 

5:30-6:15 Closing Ceremony and Performance – Institute for Latin American Studies Leaders, cultural exchange from Bolivia, Paraguay and Peru.

 

Co- sponsors: American Indian Studies, Institute for the Environment, Confluence Center, Department of History, School of Anthropology, School of Geography and Development

 

A Talk by Sebastian Quinac, a Kaqchikel Maya, at the University of Arizona

A Talk by Sebastian Quinac, a Kaqchikel Maya, at the University of Arizona

 

The Department of History at the University of Arizona Presents:

 

From Guatemala to the US: One Man’s Story of Social Organization

 

A talk by Sebastian Quinac

 Director of Project Ayuda

Tucson, AZ

Tuesday November 13, 5:30-6:30 pm

Social Sciences 128

 

Sebastian will share his account of the 1980s Guatemalan Civil War as a Kaqchikel Maya from the Highlands of Guatemala. This talk will focus on his involvement organizing indigenous communities which began in1976 and ended in 1983, when Sebastian left his country due to state-violence. Sebastian will also discuss his experience as a refugee in the US, juxtaposing the work he did in Guatemala with his endeavors in the US. Contact Edward Anthony Polanco for more information eapolanco@email.arizona.edu

First Meeting of the International Congress on “The Indigenous Peoples of Latin America” — CFP

First Meeting of the International Congress on “The Indigenous Peoples of Latin America” — CFP

*First Meeting of the International Congress on**
Indigenous Peoples in Latin America, 19th-21st Centuries.
**Advances**, Perspectives, and Challenges*

* *La Academia Mexicana de Ciencias, El Centro de Investigaciones y
Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, El Colegio de Etnólogos y
Antropólogos Sociales, A.C., El Colegio de Michoacán, A.C., El Colegio de
Sonora, El Colegio Mexiquense, A.C., El H. Ayuntamiento de Oaxaca de
Juárez, El Instituto Cultural Oaxaca, El Teatro Macedonio Alcalá, The
Institute for The Study of the Americas (the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill), The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
(the University of Texas at Austin), La Universidad Autónoma “Benito
Juárez” de Oaxaca, La Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, La Universidad de
Buenos Aires, La Universidad de Cartagena, La Universidad de La Frontera,
La Universidade Federal Fluminense, and La Universidad Nacional de La Pampa.


INVITATION TO

*First Meeting of the International Congress on “The Indigenous Peoples
of Latin America, 19th-21st Centuries. Advances, Perspectives, and
Challenges,” *to be held from *28-31 October 2013* at the Instituto
Cultural Oaxaca, Oaxaca City, Mexico.

*1. First Call: Call for** Symposium Proposals*

Call for symposia for the *First Meeting of the International Congress on
“The Indigenous Peoples of Latin America, 19th-21st Centuries. Advances,
Perspectives, and Challenges,” *to be held from 28-31 October 2013 at the
Instituto Cultural Oaxaca in Oaxaca City, Mexico.

Describing and understanding the “Other” has been a constant objective for
over 500 years; yet the concepts of the indigenous that were established in
the 16th and 17th centuries are very different to those that were
elaborated in the 18th and 19th century and subsequently reconstructed in
the 20th and 21st centuries. Diachronic and comparative analysis can bring
us closer to these concepts and so help us to understand historical and
contemporary processes, even though our visions of the past and the present
diverge and are often contradictory, both as expressed by contemporary
students of the indigenous question and by social actors themselves.
Nonetheless, it would seem that there is a common goal: that is, to
understand and explain societies which, from the various disciplinary
perspectives of the social sciences and humanities, form a vital part of
the social structure. For all this, the merely partial analysis of a
fragment of a society, in this case indigenous people, creates more
problems for understanding the past, the present, and the prospective
future, given that interactions involving other social component are
lacking. Many of these social components both influence, and are deeply
influenced by their interactions with indigenous people, for example, the
Church, the State, the Army, private landowners, or social intermediaries;
in socio-ethnic terms, we should also include indigenous of partially
African descent, mulattos, *mestizo, *and whites. For this reason, we
should emphasize the importance of these interactions to the objective
study of indigenous peoples, while paying special attention to the
proposals articulated by indigenous peoples themselves and their conception
of society at large, both now and in the past.

This said, we believe that it is important to conduct an analysis of the
political, economic, social, and cultural roles that were played by the
various societies that developed post-Independence from the captaincies and
viceroyalties of Spanish America; this analysis should continue through
Latin America’s many republican phases, address the construction and
gradual recognition of multicultural societies, and register the demands
made by many indigenous organizations and intellectuals as constitutive
parts of a broad contemporary debate about indigenous peoples.

*Call for Symposium Proposals*

The themes around which symposia will be organized are as follows:

– Social Movements and resistance
– Education
– Postcolonial Studies
– Agrarian Studies
– Territorialities
– Identities
– *Indigenismo*
– Multiculturalism
– Interculturalism
– Meanings of citizenship
– Natural resources
– Migration
– Gender

Symposium Proposals

a) In this first stage, we invite symposium proposals involving a maximum
of five participants, including the coordinator.

Subsequently, we will seek individual paper proposals for consideration and
inclusion in the symposia approved by the Organizing Committee.

b) The coordinators of each symposium will be responsible for
organizing and submitting their proposal and, once the call for individual
papers has been made, for selecting the five members of the symposium.

c) Proposals for symposia must be registered on the Congress
website www.congresopueblosindigenas.org following its publication on
*22 October
2012 and before 1 February 2013.*

d) Coordinators of symposium proposals will receive a
confirmation email.

2. Approval of Symposia

a) Proposals for symposia will be reviewed by an Academic Committee of
recognized specialists drawn from the co-organizing institutions. Proposals
for symposia will be considered on the basis of the Congress’s main themes
and using the following additional criteria: clear argumentation and
thematic development; intellectual coherence; clarity of presentation;
relevance of content.

b) The list of approved symposia will be published on the Congress website
www.congresopueblosindigenas.org on* 1 March 2013*. The second Call for
Individual Papers for inclusion in the symposia will be made on the same
date and remain open until *30 June 2013*. All decisions are final.

Sincerely,

The Committee

https://www.facebook.com/CIPIAL

congreso.pueblos.indigenas@gmail.com

Primer Congreso Internacional – Los Pueblos Indigenas de America Latina –CFP

Primer Congreso Internacional – Los Pueblos Indigenas de America Latina –CFP

*Los pueblos indígenas de América Latina, siglos XIX-XXI.*

*Avances, perspectivas y retos*

* *

La Academia Mexicana de Ciencias, el Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios
Superiores en Antropología Social, el Colegio de Etnólogos y Antropólogos
Sociales, A.C., El Colegio de Michoacán, A.C., El Colegio de Sonora, El
Colegio Mexiquense, A.C., el H. Ayuntamiento de Oaxaca de Juárez, el
Instituto Cultural Oaxaca, el Teatro Macedonio Alcalá, The Institute for
The Study of the Americas (the University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill), The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (the
University of Texas at Austin), la Universidad Autónoma “Benito Juárez” de
Oaxaca, la Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, la Universidad de Buenos
Aires, la Universidad de Cartagena, La Universidad de La Frontera, la
Universidade Federal Fluminense y la Universidad Nacional de La Pampa.

convocan

al *Primer Congreso Internacional* *“Los pueblos indígenas de América
Latina, siglos XIX-XXI. Avances, perspectivas y retos”*, que se realizará
del 28 al 31 de octubre de 2013 y que tendrá como sede el Instituto
Cultural Oaxaca en la ciudad de Oaxaca, México.

*
*

*1ª. CIRCULAR*

*CONVOCATORIA para presentar propuestas de simposios*

Se convoca a presentar simposios para el *Primer Congreso Internacional* *“Los
pueblos indígenas de América Latina, siglos XIX-XXI. Avances, perspectivas
y retos”*, a celebrarse del 28 al 31 de octubre del 2013 en la ciudad de
Oaxaca, México.

El describir y entender al “otro” ha sido un objetivo constante durante más
de 500 años; sin embargo, no es lo mismo, la concepción que se pudo tener
de y sobre lo indígena durante el siglo XVI y XVII a la que se construyó en
el siglo XVIII, la que se plasmó en el siglo XIX y a la que se reconstruyó
durante los siglos XX y XXI; sin embargo, los análisis diacrónicos y
comparativos nos acercan al análisis de concepciones que permiten entender
los procesos históricos y contemporáneos. Las visiones que sobre el pasado
se tienen divergen y en mucho llegan a ser contradictorias, no solamente
para los estudiosos de ahora sino para los propios actores del momento; sin
embargo, parecería que la meta puede ser la misma, esto es, entender y
explicar sociedades, que desde la perspectiva de las diversas disciplinas
de la historia, etnohistoria, antropología y ciencias afines son una parte
importante del engranaje social. Sin duda, el contar con un análisis de una
parte de las sociedades, en este caso los indígenas, puede causar problemas
de comprensión de ese pasado, presente y futuro, ya que faltarían
componentes sociales que en mucho influyen y se ven influidos en su
interacción con los pueblos indios, como por ejemplo, los funcionarios
civiles, la Iglesia, los propietarios privados, el ejército, el Estado
republicano, etcétera, o en términos socio-étnicos, como negros, mulatos,
mestizos, blancos, aspectos que no soslayan la importancia de analizar de
una manera objetiva el acontecer de los pueblos indígenas, así como las
propuestas que de ellos emergen hacia las sociedades mayores.

Consideramos importante realizar un análisis en torno al papel (político,
económico, social, cultural) que han tenido las sociedades que se fueron
conformando después de la independencia política de los diversos
virreinatos y capitanías de la América española, pasando por los diversos
republicanismos latinoamericanos, la conformación de sociedades
multiculturales hasta las demandas de las diversas organizaciones e
intelectuales indígenas que conforman un amplio debate en la actualidad
sobre el acontecer de los pueblos indígenas.

* Convocatoria a presentar simposios*

Las temáticas en las que se agruparán los simposios presentados en el
Congreso son las siguientes:

– Movimientos sociales y resistencia

– Educación

– Estudios en torno al poscolonialismo

– Tierras

– Territorialidades

– Identidades

– Indigenismo

– Multiculturalismo

– Interculturalidad

– Visiones sobre ciudadanía

– Recursos naturales

– Migración

– Género

1. Propuesta de Simposio

a) Esta primera etapa abre la convocatoria a presentar simposios con
un máximo de cinco participantes, incluyendo al coordinador.

Posteriormente, se convocará a la presentación de trabajos independientes
que puedan ser incluidos en los simposios aprobados por el Comité
Organizador.

b) Los coordinadores de cada simposio serán los responsables de
conformar y presentar la propuesta y, posteriormente, escoger a los otros
cinco integrantes a partir de la convocatoria abierta a todos los
interesados.

c) Cada propuesta de simposio deberá registrarse en la página web
www.congresopueblosindigenas.org y estará abierta a partir de su
publicación *22 de octubre de 2012 * al *1 de febrero de 2013*.

d) Quien proponga el simposio recibirá un correo electrónico en el que
se le acusa de recibido.


1. Aprobación de simposios

a) Las propuestas de simposios serán revisadas por un Comité
Académico conformado por especialistas miembros de las instituciones
co-organizadoras, quienes a partir de las temáticas propuestas aprobarán
los simposios bajo criterios relacionados con la argumentación o la
sustentación de la temática; coherencia en el desarrollo de las ideas;
claridad en la presentación; y, pertinencia del contenido.

b) La publicación de los simposios aprobados se darán a conocer en la
página web www.congresopueblosindigenas.org del congreso el *1 de marzo de
2013*. La convocatoria abierta a presentar trabajos para los simposios
aprobados por el Comité Organizador se podrá realizar a partir de la
publicación hasta el* 30 de junio de 2013*. Sus decisiones serán
inapelables.

Atentamente

El Comité Organizador
https://www.facebook.com/CIPIAL
congreso.pueblos.indigenas@gmail.com

44th Annual Meeting of the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies CFP

44th Annual Meeting of the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies CFP

The 44th Annual Meeting of the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies will take place 4-7 April 2013 at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.  The program committee invites 250-word abstracts of proposed twenty-minute papers on topics on Iberian and Latin American history, literature, art, and religion from the sixth to the twenty-first centuries.  Planned sessions are welcome.

The conference will be held on the campus of the University of New Mexico, home to a vibrant scholarly community in Iberian history. Beautiful Albuquerque is home to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, and the Turquoise Museum.  It is also an easy drive from Albuquerque to stunning Santa Fe, one of the oldest surviving cities founded in the United States by the Spanish.  We are delighted to announce that the plenary talk will be given by UNM alumnus Adrian Shubert (MA, 1976).

 


 

Additional information on the conference has been posted on the ASPHS website, including conference registration forms, conference events, and hotel accommodations:

http://www.asphs.net/conferences/albuquerque2013.html

The deadline for abstracts is 15 December 2012. Email submissions are encouraged.  Send inquiries and abstracts to:

erowe1@jhu.edu