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Category: Mesoamerica

Getting Acquainted with Nahuatl Nouns

Getting Acquainted with Nahuatl Nouns

If you are a beginner, start with this lesson, and keep in mind that I am discussing Early Modern Nahuatl from the Valley of Mexico, other dialects will vary. Subsequent lessons will build upon this lesson.

For tips on how to pronounce Nahuatl, click here. For other Nahuatl resources, click here.

 

What is a noun?

A noun is a word that can be the subject of a clause, or the object (indirect or direct) of a verb. In simple terms, it is a person, place, or thing.

In Nahuatl, there is one important way to identify nouns, four absolutive suffixes, which are:

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Salutations and Other Basics in Nahuatl

Salutations and Other Basics in Nahuatl

This page is intended for academic use as a tool to help students hear a native speaker of Nahuatl (Catalina de la Cruz Cruz) pronounce words and phrases. None of the files on this page or the rest of the site should be used without prior consent, and can never be used for commercial purposes.

Esta página fue creada para uso académico solamente con el fin de que los estudiantes del náhuatl puedan escuchar a una nativo hablante (Catalina de la Cruz Cruz) pronunciar palabras y frases. Ninguna parte de esta página o sitio se puede usar sin consentimiento previo y expreso. Ninguna parte se podrá usar para propósitos comerciales.

 

Salutations and the Basics

The words contained in these recordings were done in the conventions of la Huasteca Veracruzana. Other dialects of Nahuatl might use different words, please keep that in mind. The pronunciation also follows the style of la Huasteca Veracruzana.


No

      axtlen

Yes – Si

      quena

 


Problem – Problema

      cualantli

It is good/okay – Esta bien

      cualtitoc

Salutation (used among women) – Saludo (usado entre mujeres)

      hoo

Good, okay, very well (denotes approval, acceptance, agreement, assent, or acknowledgment) – Bueno (denota aprobación)

      huenoh

I salute (greet) you (used among Macehualmeh) – Saludo (usado entre macehualmeh)

      nimitztlahpaloz

Salutation – Saludo

      niyohua

Salutation (used for coyomeh) – Saludo (para coyomeh)

      piyali

See you later – Nos vemos

      timoittazceh

See you soon – Nos vemos pronto


      timoittazcehyoc

Salutation (Used among men) – Salud0 (Usado entre hombres)

      timomelahuah

Thank you – Gracias

      tlazcamati

What’s up? – ¿Que paso? (Saludo)

      tlempanoc

Forgive me / Sorry – Perdon/ Lo Siento

      xinechtlapopolhui

There isn’t any – No hay

      axoncah
A Few Animals in Nahuatl from the Huasteca Veracruzana

A Few Animals in Nahuatl from the Huasteca Veracruzana

This page is intended for academic use as a tool to help students hear a native speaker of Nahuatl (Catalina de la Cruz Cruz) pronounce words and phrases. None of the files on this page or the rest of the site should be used without prior consent, and can never be used for commercial purposes.

Esta página fue creada para uso académico solamente con el fin de que los estudiantes del náhuatl puedan escuchar a una nativo hablante (Catalina de la Cruz Cruz) pronunciar palabras y frases. Ninguna parte de esta página o sitio se puede usar sin consentimiento previo y expreso. Ninguna parte se podrá usar para propósitos comerciales.

 

Animals/Animales

The names for animals contained in these recordings were done in the conventions of la Huasteca Veracruzana. Some animals have different names in other Nahuatl speaking areas, please keep that in mind. The pronunciation also follows the style of la Huasteca Veracruzana.


 Armadillo

      calolo

Dog – Perro 

      chichi

Scorpion – Escorpión

      colotl

Tick – Garrapata

      conchura

Coyote

      coyotl

Leaf-Cutter Ant – Hormiga Corta Hoja

      cuacihuapil

Boar – Jabalí

      cuapitzotl

Rabbit – Conejo

      cuatochin

Skunk – Zorillo

      epatl

Blood Engorged Tick – Garrpata llena de sangre

      ezpolon

Ant  – Hormiga

      ixcanelin

Raccoon – Mapache

      mapachin

Deer – Venado

      mazatl

Mosquito/Zancudo

      moyotl

Fox  – Zorro

      oztotl

Flea – Pulga

      tecpin

Badger – Tejón

      tehon

Possum – Tlacuache

      tlacuachin

Iguana 

      tlacuaquilotl

Spider – Araña 

      tocatl

Squirrel – Ardilla

      tocomahtli

Argentine Ant – Hormiga Argentina

      totochin

Bird – Pájaro

      tototl

Mole – Topo

      tozan

Fire Ant – Hormiga brava

      tzicatl

Mountain lion / Wildcat – Gato montés

      zacamiztli

Mites (Scabies) – Ácaro (Sarna)

      zahuatl

Fly – Mosca

      zayolin

Louse – Piojo

      atimitl
How to Pronounce Colors and Numbers in Nahuatl

How to Pronounce Colors and Numbers in Nahuatl

This page is intended for academic use as a tool to help students hear a native speaker of Nahuatl (Catalina de la Cruz Cruz) pronounce words and phrases. None of the files on this page or the rest of the site should be used without prior consent, and can never be used for commercial purposes.

Esta página fue creada para uso académico solamente con el fin de que los estudiantes del náhuatl pueden escuchar a una nativo hablante (Catalina de la Cruz Cruz) pronunciar palabras y frases. Ninguna parte de esta página o sitio se puede usar sin consentimiento previo y expreso. Ninguna parte se podrá usar para propósitos comerciales.

 

Numbers – Numeros

The pronunciations contained in this section were recorded in the style of la Huasteca Veracruzana. Other variants (i.e., dialects) of Nahuatl might vary in certain constructions or pronunciation, but most are very similar. It is also important to note that the Nahua counting system, like most Mesoamerican systems, is vigesimal. In other words, it is a system that goes by 20, unlike decimal Western counting systems that go by 10. Here you are given the first set of 20 numbers, in a future post you will see higher powers.


0

      yonce

1

      ce

2

      ome

3

      eyi

4

      nahui

5

      macuilli

6

      chicuace

7

      chicome

8

      chicueyi

9

      chiucnahui

10

      mahtlactli

11

      mahtlactli-huan-ce

12

      mahtlactli-huan-ome

13

      mahtlactli-huan-eyi

14

      mahtlactli-huan-nahui

15

      caxtolli

16

      caxtolli-huan-ce

17

      caxtolli-huan-ome

18

      caxtolli-huan-eyi

19

      caxtolli-huan-nahui

20

      cempohualli

 

Colors – Colores

Again, the pronunciations and conventions contained in this section were done in the style of la Huasteca Veracruzana, which might vary starkly with other dialects in this particular subject.


Red/Rojo

      chichiltic

Purple/Morado

      camohtic

Brown/ Café

      cafentic

Blue/Azul

      azultic

Transparent/Transparente

      atzalantic

Orange/Anaranjado

      achilcoz

Black/Negro

      yayahuic

Green/Verde

      xoxoctic

Grey/Gris

      tenextic

Multicolor

      cuicuiltic

Pink/Rosa

      cuahuencho

Yellow/Amarillo

      coztic

Beige

      chocoxtic

White/Blanco

      chipahuac

 

Empires of the Sun – Culture and Power in Mesoamerica, in Homage to Dr. Patricia Anawalt on April 4-5, 2014

Empires of the Sun – Culture and Power in Mesoamerica, in Homage to Dr. Patricia Anawalt on April 4-5, 2014

The Art History Society of California State University Los Angeles invites you to our 2014 Symposium. Our honoree for the 2014 Mesoamerican Symposium is Dr. Patricia Reiff Anawalt. Dr. Anawalt is world renowned for her expertise in the regalia of ritual, power and quotidian life of Mesoamerican civilizations as well as for her interpretative reading of the Codex Mendoza.

 

The Codex Mendoza is the historic record of the Mexica from 1325 through 1521 that includes the detailed founding of Tenochtitlan. Among Dr. Anawalt’s published books is The Essential Codex Mendoza (co-authored with Dr. Frances Berdan), Clothing Before Cortes: Mesoamerican Costumes from the Codices (The Civilization of the American Indian Series), Shamanic Regalia from the Far North, and various others.

 

Dr. Anawalt is also the founding director of the Center for the Study of Regional Dress, a laboratory and research center located at the Fowler Museum. Our symposiums are the largest Mesoamerican gatherings in the United States and Europe by featuring top scholars and academics in the field of Mesoamerican Studies. Please glance at the attached documents which indicate the topics and lecturers that will be presented. Do not miss this stellar event. Register via Email: AHSCSULA@gmail.com. Help us pass the word by sharing this event on Facebook.

 

We look forward to hosting you on April 4-5, 2014.

 

Art History Society of California State University, Los Angeles

Jaguars, Eagles and Feathered Serpents: Mesoamerica Re-explored An Homage to Michael Coe

Jaguars, Eagles and Feathered Serpents: Mesoamerica Re-explored An Homage to Michael Coe

This conference will be held at California State University Los Angeles.

 

I will update with more details as they become available.

 

 

Friday, April 12, 2013

8:00 am           Registration

9:30 am           Opening Remarks

9:45 am           Leonardo López Luján (INAH)
Urban Archaeology in Downtown Mexico City and the Proyecto Templo Mayor

10:15 am         Saburo Sugiyama (Arizona State / INAH) / Tenoch Medina (INAH)
Time and space Materialized in the Templo Mayor Architecture: A New 3D Map of the Sacred Precinct of Tenochtitlan

15 minute break

11:00 am         María Barajas Rocha (INAH)
Conservation of the Tlaltecuhtli Monolith and Archaeological Objects Recovered During the 7th Field Season of Proyecto Templo Mayor

11:30 am         Ximena Chávez Balderas (INAH)
Effigies of the Dead: Ritual Decapitation and Skull Modification at the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan

12:00 pm         Amaranta Arguelles (INAH)
A Cosmogonic Ritual at the Foot of the Tenochtitlan’s Templo Mayor

12:30 pm lunch

1:45 pm          Leonardo López Luján (INAH)
Tenochtitlan’s Gold: The Archaeological Collection of Proyecto Templo Mayor

2:30 pm          John M.D. Pohl (UCLA)
The Toltec Ballgame: Rewards, Titles and Position in Postclassic Society

15 minute break

3:30 pm              Guilhem Olivier (UNAM)
Myth and Ritual of Access to Power in the Central Part of the Codex Borgia: A Proposal

4:15 pm          Manuel Aguilar-Moreno (CSULA)
The Millenialist Utopia of the Indian Jerusalem: Indian-Christian Art and Transculturation in 16th Century Mexico

5:30 pm          Q & A

6 pm               Reception with Mexican Snacks and Mariachi

 

 

Saturday, April 13, 2013

8:30 am          Registration

9:30 am          Opening Remarks

9:45 am          Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers (CalPoly Pomona)
Tlaloc on the Coast: Teotihuacan and Los Horcones, Chiapas

10:30 am         Megan O’Neil (BMCC-CUNY)
Topic TBA

15 minute break

11:30 am            Oswaldo Chinchilla (Yale)
Atle itlacauhca, without Flaw: The Young Gods of the Maya and Aztec

12:15 am         Mary Miller (Yale)
The Bonampak Murals: A Performance at the Maya Court

1 pm lunch

2:15 pm         Stephen D. Houston (Brown)
Run, Don’t Walk: Sacred Movement among the Classic Maya

3:00 pm         Robert H. Cobean (INAH)
Research at Ancient Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico: The Recent INAH Projects

15 minute break

4:00 pm              Karl Taube (UCR)
The Living Faces of Maize of Ancient Mesoamerica

4:45 pm          Award Ceremony

5:15 pm          Michael Coe (Yale)
Chocolate and the Mesoamerican Mind

6:00 pm          Q & A

6:30 pm          Autograph & Photograph Opportunities

 

REGISTER AHSMeso2013@gmail.com

ADMISSION: $15 Public / $10 All University Students / CSULA students receive an ASI discount

For more details follow us on Facebook:  AHS (Art History Society at CSULA)

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries Across the Americas – 2/1/2013 at the University of Arizona

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries Across the Americas – 2/1/2013 at the University of Arizona

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries

   Across the Americas

University of Arizona, Center for Latin American Studies Human Rights Initiative

                                   and                                                    

Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, Rogers College of Law

Friday, February 1, 2013

8:30am – 6pm

Arizona Historical Society

949 E. 2nd Street

The objective of this one day conference is to bring to the fore a range of issues and concerns with regard to natural resource extraction on indigenous lands across the Americas. Drawing on a human rights framework the conference participants examine some of the multiple, complex responses by indigenous peoples to the social, juridical and environmental dimensions of extraction. Recent examples from Chile to Mesoamerica to the United States, Canada and the Russian Far North illustrate the timeliness of such an examination.

 

The conference intends to facilitate a meaningful exchange of ideas and practices among social science and legal scholars, activists and between the university and the community at large. We broaden our scope geographically to open a discussion about the commonalities and contradictions that ordinary indigenous people face on their homelands. The Center for Latin American Studies will interview and film with each participant at the conference about their work. These five minute video clips will be made available on their UA LAS website.

 

Provisional Program

 

8:00 coffee

 

8:30 Yaqui Pascua opening ceremony( not confirmed)

 

8:45 Dean JP Jones, College of Social and Behavioral Science – Welcome

9:00 Professor Linda Green, Director, Center for Latin American Studies, Associate Professor of Anthropology – opening remarks, moderator

 

KeyNote

9:15  Dr. Salvador Aquino, anthropologist, CIESAS, Pacifico Sur,  Cuidad de  Oaxaca, Mexico  “Si a la vida, no a la mineria: Large scale mining exploitation and the challenges confronting indigenous peoples in Mexico”

 

10:15 coffee break

 

Panel

10:30 Professor Benadict Colombi, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, American Indian Studies, UA, “Kamchatka: Mapping Indigenous Cartographies and Extractive Industries”

11:00 Professor Dana Powell, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Appalachian State University  “Extractive Industries have productive effects: Energy activism on the Dine Nation”

11:30 Mr. Manuel Prieto, PhD student, School of Geography and Development, UA “The Chilean Water Reforms: Mining and Dispossession of the Atacameno People”

12:00 Mr. Cory Schott, PhD candidate, Dept. of History, UA “Colonial Histories of Indigenous Peoples and Extractive Industries in the Americas

12:15 Mr. Sebastian Quinac, “Reporting from the “Encouentro del Pueblos de MesoAmerica “, Sierra de Oaxaca, January 2013

 

12:30 Discussion

 

12:45-1:30 lunch hosted by LAS and IPLPP

 

1:30 Professor Robert A.Williams, Jr., E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law and American Indian Studies,  Faculty Co-Chair, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program,UA- “Indigenous Peoples’ Human Rights to Ancestral Lands in Historical and Contemporary Perspective:Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group v. Canada”

2:30 Professor James Hopkins, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, UA, “Rio Yaqui Land and Water Rights and the Agro-Chem Industrial Complex”

3:00  Ms. Seanna Howard, Staff Attorney, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program—“Maya Community of Southern Belize and Western Shoshone: Indigenous Peoples and the Inter-American Human Rights System”

3:30 “Arizona Tribes, Extractive Industries and Indigenous Human Rights”- (speaker TBA)

4:00

Mr. Austin Nunez, Chairman, San Xavier District, Tohono O’odham Nation—Mining, Water and O’odham lands (not confirmed)

Mr. Vernon Masayesva, Founder and Director of The Black Mesa Trust and former Tribal Chairman of The Hopi Nation—coal mining, water and Hopi lands (not confirmed)

 

4:30 Discussion

 

5:30-6:15 Closing Ceremony and Performance – Institute for Latin American Studies Leaders, cultural exchange from Bolivia, Paraguay and Peru.

 

Co- sponsors: American Indian Studies, Institute for the Environment, Confluence Center, Department of History, School of Anthropology, School of Geography and Development

 

A Talk by Sebastian Quinac, a Kaqchikel Maya, at the University of Arizona

A Talk by Sebastian Quinac, a Kaqchikel Maya, at the University of Arizona

 

The Department of History at the University of Arizona Presents:

 

From Guatemala to the US: One Man’s Story of Social Organization

 

A talk by Sebastian Quinac

 Director of Project Ayuda

Tucson, AZ

Tuesday November 13, 5:30-6:30 pm

Social Sciences 128

 

Sebastian will share his account of the 1980s Guatemalan Civil War as a Kaqchikel Maya from the Highlands of Guatemala. This talk will focus on his involvement organizing indigenous communities which began in1976 and ended in 1983, when Sebastian left his country due to state-violence. Sebastian will also discuss his experience as a refugee in the US, juxtaposing the work he did in Guatemala with his endeavors in the US. Contact Edward Anthony Polanco for more information eapolanco@email.arizona.edu

First Meeting of the International Congress on “The Indigenous Peoples of Latin America” — CFP

First Meeting of the International Congress on “The Indigenous Peoples of Latin America” — CFP

*First Meeting of the International Congress on**
Indigenous Peoples in Latin America, 19th-21st Centuries.
**Advances**, Perspectives, and Challenges*

* *La Academia Mexicana de Ciencias, El Centro de Investigaciones y
Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, El Colegio de Etnólogos y
Antropólogos Sociales, A.C., El Colegio de Michoacán, A.C., El Colegio de
Sonora, El Colegio Mexiquense, A.C., El H. Ayuntamiento de Oaxaca de
Juárez, El Instituto Cultural Oaxaca, El Teatro Macedonio Alcalá, The
Institute for The Study of the Americas (the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill), The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
(the University of Texas at Austin), La Universidad Autónoma “Benito
Juárez” de Oaxaca, La Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, La Universidad de
Buenos Aires, La Universidad de Cartagena, La Universidad de La Frontera,
La Universidade Federal Fluminense, and La Universidad Nacional de La Pampa.


INVITATION TO

*First Meeting of the International Congress on “The Indigenous Peoples
of Latin America, 19th-21st Centuries. Advances, Perspectives, and
Challenges,” *to be held from *28-31 October 2013* at the Instituto
Cultural Oaxaca, Oaxaca City, Mexico.

*1. First Call: Call for** Symposium Proposals*

Call for symposia for the *First Meeting of the International Congress on
“The Indigenous Peoples of Latin America, 19th-21st Centuries. Advances,
Perspectives, and Challenges,” *to be held from 28-31 October 2013 at the
Instituto Cultural Oaxaca in Oaxaca City, Mexico.

Describing and understanding the “Other” has been a constant objective for
over 500 years; yet the concepts of the indigenous that were established in
the 16th and 17th centuries are very different to those that were
elaborated in the 18th and 19th century and subsequently reconstructed in
the 20th and 21st centuries. Diachronic and comparative analysis can bring
us closer to these concepts and so help us to understand historical and
contemporary processes, even though our visions of the past and the present
diverge and are often contradictory, both as expressed by contemporary
students of the indigenous question and by social actors themselves.
Nonetheless, it would seem that there is a common goal: that is, to
understand and explain societies which, from the various disciplinary
perspectives of the social sciences and humanities, form a vital part of
the social structure. For all this, the merely partial analysis of a
fragment of a society, in this case indigenous people, creates more
problems for understanding the past, the present, and the prospective
future, given that interactions involving other social component are
lacking. Many of these social components both influence, and are deeply
influenced by their interactions with indigenous people, for example, the
Church, the State, the Army, private landowners, or social intermediaries;
in socio-ethnic terms, we should also include indigenous of partially
African descent, mulattos, *mestizo, *and whites. For this reason, we
should emphasize the importance of these interactions to the objective
study of indigenous peoples, while paying special attention to the
proposals articulated by indigenous peoples themselves and their conception
of society at large, both now and in the past.

This said, we believe that it is important to conduct an analysis of the
political, economic, social, and cultural roles that were played by the
various societies that developed post-Independence from the captaincies and
viceroyalties of Spanish America; this analysis should continue through
Latin America’s many republican phases, address the construction and
gradual recognition of multicultural societies, and register the demands
made by many indigenous organizations and intellectuals as constitutive
parts of a broad contemporary debate about indigenous peoples.

*Call for Symposium Proposals*

The themes around which symposia will be organized are as follows:

– Social Movements and resistance
– Education
– Postcolonial Studies
– Agrarian Studies
– Territorialities
– Identities
– *Indigenismo*
– Multiculturalism
– Interculturalism
– Meanings of citizenship
– Natural resources
– Migration
– Gender

Symposium Proposals

a) In this first stage, we invite symposium proposals involving a maximum
of five participants, including the coordinator.

Subsequently, we will seek individual paper proposals for consideration and
inclusion in the symposia approved by the Organizing Committee.

b) The coordinators of each symposium will be responsible for
organizing and submitting their proposal and, once the call for individual
papers has been made, for selecting the five members of the symposium.

c) Proposals for symposia must be registered on the Congress
website www.congresopueblosindigenas.org following its publication on
*22 October
2012 and before 1 February 2013.*

d) Coordinators of symposium proposals will receive a
confirmation email.

2. Approval of Symposia

a) Proposals for symposia will be reviewed by an Academic Committee of
recognized specialists drawn from the co-organizing institutions. Proposals
for symposia will be considered on the basis of the Congress’s main themes
and using the following additional criteria: clear argumentation and
thematic development; intellectual coherence; clarity of presentation;
relevance of content.

b) The list of approved symposia will be published on the Congress website
www.congresopueblosindigenas.org on* 1 March 2013*. The second Call for
Individual Papers for inclusion in the symposia will be made on the same
date and remain open until *30 June 2013*. All decisions are final.

Sincerely,

The Committee

https://www.facebook.com/CIPIAL

congreso.pueblos.indigenas@gmail.com